Can we change the rituals of our everyday life?

What are the materials that we want to see exist in the future? What are the materials that we don‘t want to see exist any longer? And can we imagine materials for our clothing or technologies that biodegrade over time?

Those are the questions Fine Brendtner asked on The World Oceans Day on the 8th of june in her workshop on bioplastics cooking and exhibition called „Future Fossils“ in our guestroom.

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“I‘m interested in materiality and my thesis deals among other things with the materiality of ocean water. I read of bioplastics in an open source book called The 3D Additivist Cookbook made by a group of artists who are all activists, it‘s all about the critiques of technology an speculative ideas of the future”

Fine has a background in art and a degree in anthropology, and as a way to combine those to aspects she decided to do her masters in visual anthropology. She found her way to the University Center of the Westfjords through her interest in ocean health and science communication.

“I’m interested in the idea of science communication because there are so many ways of of engaging with it and with environmental issues. That‘s also why I‘m studying visual anthropology and the reason why I came to the University center. I wanted to try to find an artistic way of engaging with the topic”

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She invited participants at the workshop to set an intention for themselves concerning the issue and to pour their intention into the artefact that they were making.

“I said for example “I will loose my addiction to plastic products”. It‘s the Pacific islander’s idea of mana, that certain objects can hold intentions and power and then the power of intention potentiates in the world and creates a stronger power, so the idea was that we could do this as a ritual and just perpetuate our thoughts and individual behaviour towards this materials that we use in our everyday life and just think about them a bit more consciously”

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